Diabetes

Diabetes questions and answers

Whether you want to know the recommended blood sugar numbers or need advice on how to stay motivated, our experts have tackled the 20 most commonly asked Diabetes questions and answers so you have the answers you need to successfully manage your diabetes.

Diabetes information may be found practically anywhere. Trying to figure out what is relevant to you and what isn’t might be daunting. We asked our diabetic specialists to respond to 20 of the most frequently asked Diabetes questions and answers. Here’s what they had to tell us. Healthowealth has tackled the 20 most frequently Diabetes questions and answers, so you have the answers you need to successfully manage your diabetes.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 1)

Q: What should my blood glucose levels be before and after meals (if I’m fasting)? What happens after that?

A: The American Diabetes Association advises a fasting or before-meal blood glucose (or blood sugar) target of 70–130 mg/dl for most diabetics. A postprandial blood sugar result of 180 mg/dl or less is advised one to two hours after eating.

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Diabetes questions and answers (number 1)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 2)

Q: If I’m diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, do I have to start taking insulin?

A: No, it isn’t. Insulin injections may or may not be required for people with type 2 diabetes, depending on a variety of circumstances, including the time of diagnosis. According to research, the pancreas is more likely to generate adequate insulin for longer if type 2 diabetes is treated early and blood sugar is managed initially and over time. However, someone who has had type 2 diabetes for more than 15 years is unlikely to produce enough insulin and will need to use a syringe, pen, or pump to get it.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 2)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 2)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 3)

Q: If I quit eating carbs and/or lose a lot of weight, can I get rid of type 2 diabetes?

A: No, but you have some influence over it. If you have prediabetes or were just diagnosed with type 2, decreasing a significant amount of weight can help you remission. It can be brought back by weight gain, age, or the normal course of type 2 diabetes. “It’s practically hard to go without carbs or significantly restrict them for an extended period of time. It’s also bad for your health since you won’t be getting enough critical nutrients “RD, CDE JoJo Dantone, a diabetic program coordinator in New Orleans, agrees.”

Diabetes questions and answers (number 3)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 3)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 4)

Q: Why is it okay to eat fruit if it’s high in carbs? Is it true that some fruits are better to consume than others?

A: All fruits (fresh, frozen, dried, and canned without added sugar) provide mostly carbohydrate calories with a small amount of protein. For energy and critical nutrients, diabetics must consume a particular quantity of carbohydrates each day. Fruits, vegetables, nutritious grains, legumes (beans), and low-fat dairy meals are all good sources of carbohydrates.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 4)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 4)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 5)

Q: Why do my legs hurt when I first start walking but not when I sit down?

A: You have symptoms of PAD or peripheral arterial disease. “It happens when plaque builds up in your arteries, preventing blood flow to your legs. Because muscles require more blood flow, discomfort may develop during walking. When you sit, the discomfort may subside because your muscles demand less blood flow” Marjorie Cypress, Ph.D., CNP, CDE, a nurse practitioner in Albuquerque and head of the American Diabetes Association’s Health Care and Education Committee, agrees. Heart attacks, strokes, and foot ulcers are all increased by PAD. Cypress recommends following the same guidelines for being healthy with diabetes to reduce your risk of PAD.

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Diabetes questions and answers (number 5)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 5)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 6)

Q: How can I come to terms with having diabetes?

A: Accepting that you have diabetes is essentially a cognitive act a realignment of your perceptions of what is true and crucial to your existence, as well as how it affects your life. Diabetes becomes a permanent fixture in a person’s life. “While we all wish it would just go away,” says David Marrero, Ph.D., who has diabetes and is the head of the Indiana University School of Medicine’s Diabetes Translational Research Center. Accept that diabetes will be with you for the rest of your life, says Marrero. It’s also a highly treatable condition that imposes little limits if you follow treatment guidelines.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 6)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 6)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 7)

Q: My spouse is a truck driver with type 2 diabetes. What meals will he be able to bring with him on the road?

A: According to Lisa Brown, RD, CDE, of Brown Fox Solutions in Minneapolis and head of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Diabetes Care and Education practice area, “preplanning and having nutritious snacks at the ready are important to helping you eat well on the road.” Fresh fruit, tiny containers or cans of fruit (without syrup), fat-free yogurt, part-skim cheese (sticks, slices, and cubes), sugar-free pudding cups, nuts (of any kind), whole wheat crackers or pretzels, peanut butter, baby carrots, and 100-calorie snack packs are among Brown’s suggestions (buy them or create your own). Water and zero-calorie beverages should be consumed in large quantities.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 7)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 7)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 8)

Q: Is insulin going to cause me to gain weight?

A: Insulin, either as a hormone produced by our bodies or as a pharmaceutical, is used to pump glucose into cells for energy. Insulin is responsible for calorie processing. As a result, it can, but does not have to, lead to weight gain. To avoid gaining weight, do the following: Use portion control to your advantage. Exercising helps you burn more calories. If your blood sugar was high before you started insulin, you were probably excreting calories in your urine rather than feeding your body. Once your blood sugar is under control, this won’t happen. If you have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), take 15 grams of carbs to treat it.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 8)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 8)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 9)

Q: Why is it so crucial to lose weight? What is the most effective technique for someone with type 2 diabetes to reduce weight?

A: Weight loss is essential, especially following a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or prediabetes. Weight reduction improves insulin sensitivity, allowing cells to make better use of the insulin produced by the body. Losing merely 10–20 pounds might provide a slew of advantages. Improved blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol readings, as well as perhaps requiring fewer drugs or at lower dosages, are among them. Change your lifestyle to lose weight gently and steadily. The most crucial factor in having a long life is maintaining a healthy weight.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 9)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 9)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 10)

Q: Can I consume alcoholic beverages?

A: Yes, adults with diabetes can drink alcohol and should follow the same rules as the general public: one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men, with no more than three or four drinks per day for women and men, respectively. According to Marion Franz, RD, CDE, owner of Nutrition Concepts by Franz in Minneapolis, “research demonstrates that moderate alcohol intake has negligible short- or long-term effects on glucose levels in patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes.”

Although alcoholic beverages are generated from grains or fruits (starches or sugars) by fermentation and distillation, she claims that alcohol cannot be converted to glucose.

Alcohol is also the only nutrient that does not need the breakdown of insulin for energy; carbohydrate, protein, and fat do. Drinking more than three drinks per day, on the other hand, has been demonstrated to make glucose regulation difficult over time.

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When consuming alcohol, persons who take insulin or another blood glucose-lowering medicine that might cause hypoglycemia should eat something. A word of warning to persons with type 1 diabetes: excessive alcohol consumption can lead to hypoglycemia many hours later, so check your blood sugar levels frequently while you drink.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 10)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 10)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 11)

Q: Can your menstrual cycle and/or menopause affect your blood glucose levels?

A: Yes, Hormone variations are frequent in the week leading up to a woman’s menstruation, and they might influence glucose management. Estrogen and progesterone levels rise after ovulating. “Estrogen can make women more insulin-sensitive, resulting in hypoglycemia. Progesterone, on the other hand, has the ability to do the opposite “The University of Southern California’s Natalie Strand, M.D., agrees. Strand was the first person with diabetes to win the television show The Amazing Race. After the first few days of the menstrual cycle, glucose levels usually recover to normal. “To learn your tendencies, check your glucose levels and evaluate your monthly swings,” she advises. Then come up with a management strategy for these days. Menopause can also influence blood sugar levels. “Estrogen and progesterone vary during perimenopause, causing glucose fluctuations,” adds Strand. Hypoglycemia caused by the loss of progesterone is an early symptom of perimenopause in women who use insulin.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 11)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 11)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 12)

Q: What meals should you consume before and after you exercise?

A: Carbohydrate-rich foods are rapid and easy to digest and provide energy. “Eat calorie-dense items like bread, crackers, pretzels, dry cereal, 100% fruit juice, or sports drinks,” advises Gary Scheiner, CDE, an exercise physiologist, and proprietor of Integrated Diabetes Services in Philadelphia. If you’re trying to lose weight and aren’t in danger of hypoglycemia, though, just drink water—the same goes for after exercise. You don’t need to eat unless your workout was very strenuous or lasted several hours. Physically active insulin users should talk to their doctors about how to alter their insulin doses.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 12)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 12)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 13)

Q: If my wife and I clean the same lancet, why can’t we use it?

A: According to Connie Crawley, RD, nutrition and health expert at the University of Georgia Extension Service in Athens, “the CDC strongly recommends that blood-testing instruments, including lancets, should never be used by more than one person to prevent any potential of infection.” “Also, alcohol might not be enough to disinfect a lancet.”

Diabetes questions and answers (number 13)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 13)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 14)

Q: Is it possible for me to be free of diabetes? Is it ever going to go away?

A: You have type 1 or type 2 diabetes for the rest of your life if you are diagnosed with it. Maintain proper blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels to stay healthy. To do so, eat well, exercise regularly, and take your meds as directed. Get the tests and exams you need to discover issues early and aggressively address them.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 14)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 14)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 15)

Q: How often should I change the batteries in my glucose meter?

A: The only reason to change your meter is if you discover that its strips aren’t working properly. Use the control solution that came with your meter to check. Janine Freeman, RDN, CDE, a member of the American Association of Diabetes Educators Board of Directors, says, “It’s a vital monitoring supply that many individuals don’t know about or utilize.”

To use the control solution, place a drop on a strip (according to the amount of blood you’ll need) and perform a test. The glucose range shown on the vial of strips is the range in which the result should fall. Your meter and strips are operating properly if it’s within the range. If this is not the case, contact the manufacturer for assistance and maybe a free replacement meter. “Use control solution every time you open a new box of strips or any time you feel your meter or strips aren’t functioning together,” adds Freeman, who also recommends cleaning and sanitizing your meter at least once a week and before letting anyone else use it if blood is present. Because there is so much innovation, Freeman recommends replacing your meter every five or so years.

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Diabetes questions and answers (number 15)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 15)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 16)

Q: Should I have glucose pills with me at all times?

A: Your risk of hypoglycemia is determined by the type of blood glucose-lowering medication(s) you are taking, not by your diabetes type. Insulin, sulfonylureas like glyburide (Diabeta, Glynase, Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol), and glimepiride (Amaryl), and glinides like repaglinide (Prandin) and nateglinide can all produce hypoglycemia (Starlix). Always carry therapy if you use one of these drugs. Hypoglycemia is not a side effect of most blood glucose-lowering medicines for type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 16)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 16)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 17)

Q: Is it true that diabetic consequences can be postponed or perhaps avoided?

A: Of course! According to research, the sooner you are identified with diabetes and begin actively lowering your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels, the healthier you will be over time. Make sure your health care physician orders all of the tests and checkups you require to be healthy and spot any issues early. If you see any indications or symptoms of potential concern, tell your doctor. Diabetes problems are no longer necessary.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 17)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 17)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 18)

Q: Do I have to take insulin for the rest of my life? Why can’t I just take pills?

A: If you have type 2 diabetes and have been prescribed insulin, you’ll likely need it to lower your blood sugar levels farther than tablets can. In this instance, insulin shots will almost certainly be required for the rest of your life. If you started taking insulin because you had an illness, underwent surgery, or were in the hospital for a medical reason, your insulin requirement may be brief. These circumstances cause stress, which might cause blood sugar levels to rise. You may be able to reduce or stop using insulin after the stress subsides, and return to your usual treatment schedule. “The major if,” says Dan Kent, Pharm.D., CDE, a specialty clinical pharmacist at Group Health in Seattle and a member of the American Association of Diabetes Educators Board of Directors, “is if your pancreas still produces enough insulin to keep your glucose down.” “Other than insulin, today’s glucose-lowering drugs (mostly tablets and a few injectables) work in a variety of ways to decrease blood glucose levels. They don’t drop blood sugar as effectively as insulin, owing to the fact that insulin may be adjusted as needed “According to Kent.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 18)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 18)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 19)

Q: How can I get more motivated to look for myself?

A: Managing diabetes while still completing your daily to-do list and other commitments is difficult. It’s simple to see why motivation ebbs and flows. BJ Fogg, head of Stanford University’s Persuasive Technology Lab and a recognized researcher on human behavior modification, gives these pointers to get you started:

  • Get rid of the all-or-nothing mentality.
  • Don’t categorize oneself as good or terrible.
  • Make little changes to your habits one at a time. Once you’ve achieved success, you may move on to changing another little behavior, and then another. You’ll eventually get “success momentum.” Fogg advises starting with what you already want to change, rather than what you know you should but don’t want to.
Diabetes questions and answers (number 19)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 19)

Diabetes questions and answers (number 20)

Q: I recently received a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Is it necessary for me to see an endocrinologist?

A: “While diabetes is an endocrine illness and falls under the specialty of an endocrinologist, there are only 3,000 of us in the United States who treat diabetes,” says Nicholas Argento, M.D., a type 1 diabetic endocrinologist at Maryland Endocrine in Baltimore. Calculate the following: Diabetes affects 25 million individuals, and endocrinologists are in short supply. “Most patients with type 2 diabetes can work with a primary care provider who takes an active interest in their diabetes, especially in the early years,” Argento adds. Ascertain that your doctor is up to date and providing you with the care that is consistent with current standards. Ask questions and take an active role in your care.

Diabetes questions and answers (number 20)
Diabetes questions and answers (number 20)
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10 Comments

  1. I was able to solve many of my questions through this article about diabetes questions and answers. Thank you very much!!!

    1. our pleasure! In collecting these topics about diabetes questions and answers, we had no purpose other than to increase the level of information of our readers.

    1. After reading diabetes questions and answers, if you need more comprehensive studies, check out the website articles.

  2. This is the best list of diabetes questions. On the other hand we have the best anwers here for patients and medical students…
    I hope all people with diabetes or those who have a loved one with diabetes read this article very carefully.
    I wish I could give this article 10 stars.

    1. How encouraging to read your feedback! Our experts have tried their best to provide useful and accurate information on diabetes questions and answers.

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